Historical Figures

The Shrine of the Báb and its Terraces at night

The Shrine of the Báb and its Terraces at night

The Bab

On May 23, 1844 Siyyid `Alí-Muhammad of Shiraz, Iran proclaimed that he was “The Báb” (الباب “the Gate”), referencing his later claim to the station of Mahdi, the Twelfth Imam of Shi`a Islam. His followers were known as Bábís. As the Báb’s teachings spread, which the Islamic clergy saw as a threat, his followers came under increased persecution and torture. The conflicts escalated in several places to military sieges by the Shah’s army. The Báb himself was imprisoned and eventually executed in 1850.

Bahá’ís see the Báb as the forerunner of the Bahá’í Faith, because the Báb’s writings introduced the concept of “He whom God shall make manifest”, a Messianic figure whose coming, according to Bahá’ís, was announced in the scriptures of all of the world’s great religions, and whom Bahá’u’lláh, the founder of the Bahá’í Faith, claimed to be in 1863.


Bahá’u’lláh

Mírzá Husayn `Alí Núrí was one of the early followers of the Báb, and later took the title of Bahá’u’lláh. He was arrested and imprisoned for this involvement in 1852. Bahá’u’lláh relates that in 1853, while incarcerated in the dungeon of the Síyáh-Chál in Tehran, he received the first intimations that he was the one anticipated by the Báb.

Shortly thereafter he was expelled from Tehran to Baghdad, in the Ottoman Empire; then to Constantinople (Istanbul); and then to Adrianople (Edirne). In 1863, at the time of his banishment from Baghdad to Constantinople, Bahá’u’lláh declared his claim to a divine mission to his family and followers. Tensions then grew between him and Subh-i-Azal, the appointed leader of the Bábís who did not recognize Bahá’u’lláh’s claim. Throughout the rest of his life Bahá’u’lláh gained the allegiance of most of the Bábís, who came to be known as Bahá’ís. Beginning in 1866, he began declaring his mission as a Messenger of God in letters to the world’s religious and secular rulers, including Pope Pius IX, Napoleon III, and Queen Victoria.

Approach and entrance to the Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh

Approach and entrance to the Shrine of Bahá’u’lláh

In 1868 Bahá’u’lláh was banished by Sultan Abdülâziz a final time to the Ottoman penal colony of `Akká, in present-day Israel. Towards the end of his life, the strict and harsh confinement was gradually relaxed, and he was allowed to live in a home near `Akká, while still officially a prisoner of that city.He died there in 1892. Bahá’ís regard his resting place at Bahjí as the Qiblih to which they turn in prayer each day.

Map of Bahá’u’lláh’s Travels during His Exile

Map of Bahá’u’lláh’s Travels during His Exile

‘Abdu’l-Bahá

‘Abdu’l-Bahá

‘Abdu’l-Baha

(23 May 1844 – 28 Nov. 1921)

‘Abbás Effendi was Bahá’u’lláh’s eldest son, known by the title of `Abdu’l-Bahá (Servant of Bahá). His father left a Will that appointed `Abdu’l-Bahá as the leader of the Bahá’í community, and designated him as the “Centre of the Covenant”, “Head of the Faith”, and the sole authoritative interpreter of Bahá’u’lláh’s writings. `Abdu’l-Bahá had shared his father’s long exile and imprisonment, which continued until `Abdu’l-Bahá’s own release as a result of the Young Turk Revolution in 1908. Following his release he led a life of travelling, speaking, teaching, and maintaining correspondence with communities of believers and individuals, expounding the principles of the Bahá’í Faith.


Shoghi Effendi, known as the Guardian, led the Bahá’í Faith from 1921 until his death in 1957.

Shoghi Effendi, known as the Guardian, led the Bahá’í Faith from 1921 until his death in 1957.

Shoghi Effendi

(March 1, 1897 – Nov. 4, 1957)

Shoghi Effendi throughout his lifetime translated Bahá’í texts; developed global plans for the expansion of the Bahá’í community; developed the Bahá’í World Centre; carried on a voluminous correspondence with communities and individuals around the world; and built the administrative structure of the religion, preparing the community for the election of the Universal House of Justice. He died in 1957 under conditions that did not allow for a successor to be appointed.


Baha’i Administration

Bahá’u’lláh’s Kitáb-i-Aqdas and The Will and Testament of `Abdu’l-Bahá are foundational documents of the Bahá’í administrative order. Bahá’u’lláh established the elected Universal House of Justice, and `Abdu’l-Bahá established the appointed hereditary Guardianship and clarified the relationship between the two institutions.In his Will, `Abdu’l-Bahá appointed his eldest grandson, Shoghi Effendi, as the first Guardian of the Bahá’í Faith.

The Seat of the Universal House of Justice on Mount Carmel. This building houses the international governing council of the worldwide Bahá’í community.

The Seat of the Universal House of Justice on Mount Carmel. This building houses the international governing council of the worldwide Bahá’í community.


At local, regional, and national levels, Bahá’ís elect members to nine-person Spiritual Assemblies, which run the affairs of the religion. There are also appointed individuals working at various levels, including locally and internationally, which perform the function of propagating the teachings and protecting the community. The latter do not serve as clergy, which the Bahá’í Faith does not have. The Universal House of Justice, first elected in 1963, remains the successor and supreme governing body of the Bahá’í Faith, and its 9 members are elected every five years by the members of all National Spiritual Assemblies.

Historical Figures: Excerpt adapted from wikipedia.org.

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